Red Airlines

Virtual Airline Group Australia

Celebrating our 10th Anninversary 1 April 2010 - 1 April 2020 and still flying wherever you fly

PILOT BRIEFING:

World Events

During this period of unprecedented turbulance to our everyday lives, please take care of yourself and those around you. 


New Members

And a big Hello and Welcome to Danielle and Bert who have both joined us recently and to Brian also who joined even more recently! Welcome aboard all and good flying!


Stay safe.

Which Airlines Still Fly Old Planes?













Once upon a time, airlines would keep their aircraft going for as long as possible. They were true workhorses which, if maintained correctly, were built to last.


Today, chances are if you go to an airport you’re going to see rows of modern airliners parked at the gates which all look the same, regardless of who built them.


For many enthusiasts it’s a real thrill to fly on an older plane, to relive the sights and sounds.

If you’re not such a fan, you may want to avoid these older types to make sure you get the latest in safety, fuel economy and comfort on board. After all, inflight entertainment and quiet engines were not always common in old planes!

Propliners and older jets

The days of classic old propliners and first generation jets are mostly behind us.

The Douglas DC-3. It was built in the thousands, and certainly built to last! Buffalo Airways in Yellowknife, Canada, is perhaps the most famous operator of the type (and older propliners like the Curtiss-Wright C-46 and Lockheed L-188 Electra).


Sadly they don’t offer passenger services in these aircraft.


First generation jets like the Boeing 707, Douglas DC-8, Comet, Convair 880/990, Sud Caravelle, Trident and Vickers VC10 are all consigned to history, apart from a few cargo and VIP 707s and DC-8s.


Other propliners and early tuboprops like the Bristol Britannia, Handley Page Herald, Vickers Viscount, Douglas DC-4, DC-6 and DC-7 are also well and truly retired.

Continued -  Pre-1995 Classic Airliners
















In the 1980s, airliners like the BAC 1-11, Douglas DC-9, Boeing 727, 737-200, early 747s, Lockheed L1011 TriStar and McDonnell Douglas DC-10 were all really common.


Even Concorde was quite a familiar sight if you visited certain airports.


Now it seems they’ve all just about disappeared.

Of the list above, the Boeing 737-200 is probably the most common today. You can still find them flying in Canada’s remoter regions with airlines like AirNorth, Canadian North, and Chrono Aviation.


Later ‘classic’ variants of the 737, such as the 737-300, -400 and -500 are still fairly common, but diminishing fast. You can still fly them with airlines like Air Inuit, Chrono Aviation, Canadian North and Nolinor in Canada, Boliviana in South America, Belavia in Belarus, ALK in Bulgaria, SCAT in Kazakhstan, Star Peru in Peru, Nam Air in Indonesia, Nauru Airlines in Australasia and some African and Asian carriers.


The -400 is in services with IAero Airlines in the USA, Flair Airlines in Canada, AlbaStar in Spain, Safair in South Africa, Yan Air in Ukraine, Air Mediterranean in Greece.


The shorter -500 is rarer, but you can still fly them in Ukraine with Bravo Airways and Yan Air, AeroRegional in Ecuador, SCAT in Kazakhstan, SmartAvia and UTair in Russia plus Bahamasair and various airlines in Canada, Iran and Africa.

In Iran, there’s still the chance to fly on a Boeing 747-300 classic for the time being, with Mahan Airlines. You will also find types like the Airbus A300B4, A310, Fokker 100 and Bae 146 flying there.


The McDonnell Douglas MD-80 series was a development of the DC-9 which was quite popular for many years before largely dropping off the radar. American Airlines retired its fleet at the end of 2019, but you can still fly on them for the time being with Delta Air Lines in the USA.


Airliners that were considered fairly advanced when they emerged in the 1990s are also now fairly rare. I’m thinking of types like the Bae 146/Avro RJ, Bae ATP, Fokker 50, Fokker 70 and Saab 340/2000.


But many of these are still easy enough to fly on if you try hard enough – even in Europe and North America. Airlines like Eastern Airways, Loganair, Air Antwerp, Tus Airways, Alliance Airlines and PenAir fly some of the types.


Read the full story here.

RELOCATION FLIGHTS   Please nominate using form below table

Aircraft Type
 Tail No
 From
 To
Comment
Pilot in Command
 Status
F7X
 RED-39
 SBGR
 YSSY
Flight terminating in Auckland
  Fackprod
  Landed
LJ45
RED-41
YAYE
YSSY
Via Alice Springs
  Fackprod
  Landed
A380
RED-12
ENGM
YSSY
Multi-leg
No route specified
 
B717-200 
RED717 
YSCH 
YSSY 
Direct 
  Retep292
  Landed
CRJ7 
RED-38
NCRG 
NZAA 
Direct 
 
 
B787-9 
RED-166 
OEJN 
YSSY 
Via Perth YPPH 
 
 
L100-30 
REDL09 
YMER 
YSSY 
Direct
 
 
GA-8 
RED-69 
YPMQ 
YSSY 
Via Newcastle
  Fackprod
  Landed
 
Thank you for contacting us. Your nomination will be considered as soon as possible
Oops. An error occurred.
Click here to try again.

  Pilot Bonus Award 

The top three pilots by flight! According to the monthly flight report will have their flights multiplied by their miles flown. The pilot with the highest calculated number will be awarded the pilot bonus award for the next month. The bonus is 60% of VA income Per flight and Home page status for the month.

  Bonus Awarded To..

      Alistair McRobert

 Month : April

 flights :  46

 Miles   :  90,035

 Score   :   4,141,610

 
 

Red Airlines is a virtual airline. No material appearing on this website should be used or relied upon for real world flying.

Members Area

DEPARTURES

Recent Forum posts.